Bay State Perennial Farm
Bay State on Facebook

Perennials 

A B C D E F&G H I&J K&L M-O P&Q R S T-Z

Bay State Perennial Farm is known for its wide selection of perennials. Plants are listed alphabetically by their latin names and can be located by clicking on the first letter of the plant name in the alphabet above.

Belamcanda chinensis

Belamcanda chinensis (Candy Lily)

Baptisia australis     (Blue False Indigo) Showy indigo-blue flowers carried on tapering spikes up to a foot long. Spikes are held just above the dense, bushy mounds of soft blue/green leaves. Large black seed pods follow the flowers and remain decorative into early winter, 4’ tall. Tolerant of a wide range of soil types and moisture levels, except overly wet, soggy places. For sun to part shade. Deer resistant, attracts butterflies. A beautiful, easy to please, long-lived perennial that looks good combined with just about anything! Zone 4.

Baptisia DECADENCE™ ‘Lemon Meringue’New   Impressive vigor compared to other yellow Baptisia. Forms an upright, mound of attractive blue-green foliage topped with long, charcoal stems carrying charcoal buds that open to lemon yellow flowers. Attractive seed pods in fall. 3ft. tall. Zone 3. Earned the Colorado State University “Top Performer” award and was selected as the Int’l Hardy Plant Union Perennial of 2012.

Baptisia Midnight Prairie Blues™    Midnight Prairieblues brings something entirely new to the Baptisia world in the form of, not one, but two overlapping bloom cycles. As usual, deep violet flower spikes are produced at the top of tall, 3-4' vase-shaped clumps, in June. What's unique about this cultivar is the simultaneous development of shorter, secondary blooming stems that lengthen the bloom period by up to a month. Long lived and drought tolerant, once established, practically indestructable! Full sun to light shade,(stems will flop in too much shade), average, well drained soil. Baptisias form substantial clumps that require little fussing over. In time, they may be divided but the decision to do so should not be taken lightly as the crowns become massive and their division requires a mornings' worth of sweat equity. Zone 4. 

Baptisia x ‘Carolinia Moonlight’     Vigorous clumps of gray-green foliage topped by long spikes of butter-yellow, pea-like flowers in April-May, long-lived, heat and drought tolerant. Could work as an alternative to Lupines. From a cross between B. alba and B. sphaerocarpa. Grows 4-5' tall by 3' wide, zones 4-9.

Baptisia Midnight Prairieblues 175

Baptisia x ‘Midnight Prairieblues’    'Midnight Prairieblues' brings something entirely new to the Baptisia world in the form of, not one, but two overlapping bloom cycles. As usual, deep violet flower spikes are produced at the top of tall, 3-4' vase-shaped clumps, in June. What's unique about this cultivar is the simultaneous development of shorter, secondary blooming stems that lengthen the bloom period by up to a month. Long lived and drought tolerant, once established, practically indestructable! Full sun to light shade,(stems will flop in too much shade), average, well drained soil. Baptisias form substantial clumps that require little fussing over. In time, they may be divided but the decision to do so should not be taken lightly as the crowns become massive and their division requires a mornings' worth of sweat equity. Zone 4.

Baptisia x variicolor Starlite Prairieblues

Baptisia x ‘Starlight Prairie Blues™     Another terrific hybrid from the Chicago Botanic Garden. Grows 3ft. tall with 24in. flower stems bearing masses of bi-colored flowers of periwinkle blue with contrasting butter yellow keels. Rugged, carefree and long blooming.

Baptisia x variicolor Twilite Prairieblues

Baptisia x Twilight Prairie Blues™     This new baptisia was developed and introduced by the Chicago Botanic Garden. Plants exhibit hybrid vigor and by the third year can be expected to produce upwards of 100 flower spikes of unique, deep, violet- purple flowers highlighted by a lemon-yellow keel. Spikes can be up to 32ins. long, bringing the total plant height to 4 or 5ft. Best form and flowering is achieve in full sun, in well drained soil. Zone 4.

Belamcanda chinensis     We use the blackberry lily in the center of island beds and at the back of long borders where its iris-like leaves contrast nicely with surrounding foliage and its 2in. wide, bright orange, flowers delicately arrayed on 4-5 foot stalks  establish a bold presence while, at the same time, maintaining a light, airy demeanor. The shiny black fruits that follow the flowers are attractive in the garden and in arrangements. Zone 5. FullSun-s Drip Drip2 Attracts Butterflies scissors

Bergenia cordifolia    Large, broad, leathery leaves form impressive clumps which spread moderately fast from creeping rhizomes. Umbrella-like flower clusters appear in spring on thick stems, usually in shades of red but also white.  Not fussy about soil, though seems to do best with moisture and poorly in dry soils. Tolerates full sun in the North, especially if moist, and does well in light shade.  Plants are evergreen in the South but not reliably so in the North. Spreads well enough to be used as a ground cover and, given the right conditions, can be very effective in this application. Zone 4. FullSun-s PartialShade-s Drip2 Drip3 Attracts Butterflies scissors

    ‘Bressingham Ruby’    Big, glossy, leathery leaves turn rich maroon with crimson undersides. 12in., thick, deep pink flower spikes bloom in April-May. Overall height of foliage and flowers is 16-18ins. These are dense, attention-getting plants that always make a strong statement in the landscape. Very effective in groups and when used for edging. Reasonably moist, part shade conditions are favored, but plants will adapt to drier, sunnier conditions. Zone 3

Boltonia asteroides var. latisquama ‘Jim Crockett’    A dwarf form developed by Dr. Thomas Boyle of the University of Massachusetts and named in honor of Jim Crockett, former host of the Victory Garden television show. Plants grow to 20ins. and produce masses of mauve-pink daisies July through late September. Attractive blue/green, milldew resistent foliage. Flowers are a bit smaller than those of Aster x frikartii,but the color is close, and the bloom period equally long. An attractive but underused border perennial that shows a steady supply of flowers from the middle to the end of the season, over dark green and clean foliage, pest free. Tolerant of a range of soil types from dryish to moist but will perform best in sun with average or better soil that remains reasonably moist but well-drained. 18-24" tall. Zone 3.

Boltonia asteroides ‘Snowbank’     Tall, billowy clumps to 4-5’ tall with masses of 1” wide, white daisy-like flowers in late summer-fall. Sturdier than variety ‘Pink Beauty’ which should be staked, ‘Snowbank’ stands tall at the back of the sunny border lending vertical contrast and late season color. Attracts butterflies, is deer resistant and is a good cut flower. Zone 3. 

Brunnera macrophylla (Siberian Bugloss)    Sprays of Forget-me-not, bright blue flowers in spring, over large, heart-shaped, cupped and corrugated leaves that are perfectly layered one on top of the other to form a symmetrical mound that remains attractive all season long. Prefers evenly moist soil in part to full shate. Zone 3.

    ‘Hadspen Cream’     A delicate cream border traces the edges of deep green, heart-shaped leaves. Sprays of blue forget-me-not flowers bloom in spring. To 12".

Brunnera 'Jack Frost'

'Jack Frost'    A gorgeous sport of B. 'Langtrees', displaying leaves with a frosty silver overlay and light green venation, resembling cracked porcelain. Sprays of tiny blue flowers in spring are a nice bonus on this fantastic foliage plant.

    ‘Variegata’      Large heart-shaped leaves with bold white margins and clear blue, forget-me-not flowers that float above the leaves in early spring. A beautiful plant that combines gorgeous foliage and charming flowers. For shade where the soil is rich and evenly moist. Zone 3.

Back to Top

More Perennials

bar002

Location of the Nursery:
Bay State Perennial Farm
36 State Road (Routes 5 & 10)
Whately, MA 01093
(413) 665-3525

 

Mailing Address:
Bay State Perennial Farm
P.O.Box 706
N. Hatfield, MA 01066

 

Bay State on Facebook

© 2013 Bay State Perennial Farm - No unauthorized use allowed - All rights reserved.